Healing Walk 2011
Keepers of the Athabasca
We are First Nations, Metis, Inuit, environmental groups, and Watershed citizens working together for the protection of water, land and air, and thus for all living things today and tomorrow in the Athabasca River Watershed.

Our mission: To unite the peoples of the Athabasca River and Lake Watershed to secure and protect water and watershed lands for ecological, social, cultural and community health and well being.

» Download our Keepers of the Athabasca brochure (750KB PDF)
» Download our I'm a Keeper brochure (2.1Mb PDF)
Newsletters
» June 2015 newsletter (740KB PDF)
The latest news from the Keepers, including reports on the We are the Land Conference, Healing Walk 2010-14, and more.

» July 2011 newsletter (1.2MB PDF)
What's New
Blast Zone signs warn of train danger
June 25, 2015
The Keepers of the Athabasca call on Transport Canada to perform independent inspections instead of relying on rail companies, in order to verify public safety. Commemorating two years after Lac Megantic, Keepers are putting up "Blast Zone" signs to warn the public that within 1 kilometre from passing trains, we are in the ‘blast zone’.
» RELEASE: Blast Zone signs warn of train danger (140KB PDF)

Open Letter regarding the Swan Hills Treatment Centre
June 8, 2015
In this letter, we state our concerns related to the reissuing of the Government of Alberta Approval for the Swan Hills Treatment Centre (SHTC) operated by SENA Waste Services Inc, which approval expires on November 15, 2015. First operational in 1987, SHTC treats hazardous waste in many ways, including hazardous waste incinerators and deep well injection. SHTC has released hazardous material into the environment both as 'allowable emissions' and un-planned releases.
» LETTER: To the ESRD regarding the Swan Hills Treatment Centre (140KB PDF)

Low water levels raise questions on Alberta’s water use policies
May 27, 2015
With the entire province of Alberta under a complete fire ban due to extremely low water levels and very dry conditions, Keepers of the Athabasca is asking the newly elected government to consider how the proposed Surface Water Quantity Management Framework that is set for implementation in fall of 2015, may adversely impact water levels.
» RELEASE: Low Water Levels Raise questions on Alberta’s Water Use Policies (1MB Word document)

We are the Land: Energy and Food Sustainability Conference
May 21, 2015
The We are the Land conference is about "Remembering our ancestors' ways, honoring them, while learning about the new sustainable technologies that are becoming more commonly used." Indigenous communities can be vulnerable due to lack of infrastructure, internal economy, or political or economic support. With this conference, the Keepers of the Athabasca and our partners bring to light the potential of food security and energy security to make great strides towards communities' self-sufficiency.
» RELEASE: We are the Land: Energy and Food Sustainability Conference (140KB PDF)
» WEBSITE: We are the Land

Cold Lake FN Elder advises on using steam and pressure where the Earth is fragile
May 13, 2015
Cold Lake First Nation Elder Nancy Scanie declares that instead of laying off thousands of workers and denying entry to the heavily damaged Primrose site to Cold Lake First Nation, companies and governments should work together with First Nations, employing Traditional Ecological Knowledge and their workforce in this time of oil and gas slow down, to perform their due diligence required by law, and clean up. Considering the recent revelations that earthquakes in the Fox Creek area were caused by local fracking processes, the Alberta Energy Regulator’s Approvals for steam assisted gravity drainage, cyclical steam, fracking, and other oil and gas extraction technologies using steam and pressure in the Cold Lake area must be urgently re-examined.
» RELEASE: Cold Lake FN Elder advises: Danger! Using steam and pressure where the Earth is fragile (80KB PDF)

Mikisew Cree and Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation challenge conclusions of the Obed Mine disaster's Human Health Risk Assessment
May 8, 2015
Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation (ACFN) and Mikisew Cree First Nation (MCFN) describe how the Human Health Risk Assessment released by Obed Mine on January 22, 2015 ignores the precautionary principle, uses dubious methodology, and fails to protect downstream users of the Athabasca River. ACFM and MCFN question many aspects of the Assessment.
» RELEASE: Mikisew Cree and Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation challenge conclusions of the Obed Mine disaster's Human Health Risk Assessment (150KB PDF)

» More news
More information
Our key sponsors
      
The Keepers of the Athabasca depends upon our many sponsors and volunteers who make our activities possible. Thank you for helping to keep the Athabasca!
» Full sponsor list